B Vitamins

 

 

Vitamin

Food Sources

Uses in Body

 

 

 

 

 

B1 or Thiamin

Pork, liver, whole grains, enriched grain products, peas, meat, legumes.

Converts blood sugar into energy,  synthesis of ATP

 

 

 

B2 or Riboflavin

Liver, milk, dark green vegetables, whole and enriched grain products, eggs.

metabolism of calories, red blood cells production,

healthy skin and vision

 

 

 

B3 or Niacin (nicotinamide, nicotinic acid)

Liver, fish, poultry, meat, peanuts, whole and enriched grain products.

Converting calories to energy

 

 

 

 

B5 or Pantothenic acid

Liver, kidney, meats, egg yolk, whole grains, legumes; also made by intestinal bacteria.

Converting calories to energy

 B6 or (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine)

 

 

 

 

 

Pork, meats, whole grains and cereals, legumes, green, leafy vegetables.

Protein metabolism, red blood cell metabolism, and making of Hemoglobin

B7 or Biotin

 

 

Liver, kidney, egg yolk, milk, most fresh vegetables, also made by intestinal bacteria.

Formation of glucose, metabolism of amino acids

B9 or Folacin (folic acid)

 

 

Liver, kidney, dark green leafy vegetables, meats, fish, whole grains, fortified grains and cereals, legumes, citrus fruits

Production of new cells

 

 

Vitamin B12 or Cobalamin
 

Found only in animal foods: meats, liver, kidney, fish, eggs, milk and milk products, oysters, shellfish.

Healthy nerve and red blood cells

 

 

 

 

 

 

*It is important to replenish these vitamins because they are water soluble.  Which means you will sweat them out as you work out.*

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

 

 

Anderson, J and Young, L. Water-Soluble Vitamins. 2006. Colorado State University Cooperative

 

Extension. 29 May 2007. <http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/FOODNUT/09312.html>

 

 

 

Life Clinic Health Management Systems. 2007. 29 May 2007. <http://www.lifeclinic.com/default.asp>

 

 

 

Linus Pauling Institute Micronutrient Research for Optimum Health. 2006. Oregon State University.

 

29 May 2007. <http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/>

 

 

 

 

Office of Dietary Supplements. National Institutes of Health. 29 May 2007. <http://ods.od.nih.gov/>